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Myth about opals

Myth about opals
Myth -opals are bad luck.
Facts - In 1829 Sir Walter Scott published a novel called Anne of Geierstein. In his novel he used an opal to reflect the changing fortunes of the heroin. She was wearing a hairpin with an opal in it and one day a bit of holy water was poured on to it. The next day the heroine and the opal was gone, and there was only a bit of ash left.
Believe it or not, but that story still sticks with some people!!.
When the first Quality black opal reached the marked, the diamond traders didn't like it and saw it as a thread to their industry and therefor gave it a bad name.
Myth – You can’t put opal in water.
Facts - Australian Opal is non-porous and therefore impervious - it cannot soak up water, oil, or any other liquid. Therefor it can’t do any damage to the opal. It is advised that doublet and triplet opal shouldn't be submersed in to water, as it could get in between the layers, where it’s cemented together.
Myth – opals has to be put in to water, to avoid cracking.
Facts - A solid opal contains 6-12 % water and is stable. It will only crack, if it is exposed to extreme heat for a period of time. The best thing you can do to an opal is wearing it. Doublet and triplet opal shouldn't be submersed in to water, as it could get in between the layers, where it’s cemented together.
Myth - Opals are extremely fragile and will break very easily.
Fact - It's true that opals are more fragile than some gemstones, however they're not as fragile as some people imagine. They are 5.5 – 6.5 on the Mohs scale, where pearls is 2.5 – 4.5 and diamonds are 10. Try to avoid to stand on hard surfaces, when putting on your jewellery. Otherwise just use a bit of common sense, and treat it for what it is – a very precious piece of jewellery..